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Aug 152012
 

The Hygiology Post is presenting information about a company that seems to have much potential to help many people. 2012 may be a pivotal year in determining how helpful the patented technologies may actually be for people.    

Senesco Technologies has continued to update information on its web site (https://www.senesco.com/; obtained on 8-15-12). As a matter of disclosure : The author continues to be a current shareholder in the company.

 The Senesco Technologies web site ( https://www.senesco.com/newsitem.php?id=256; obtained on 8-15-12) has posted relevant information about its research. Here is an excerpt:

“8/15/2012

Senesco Announces that SNS01-T Showed Good Tolerability and Stable Disease in Newly Completed First Cohort of Phase 1b/2a Multiple Myeloma Trial Senesco Given the Green Light to Increase the Dose in Cohort 2

BRIDGEWATER, N.J. (August 15th, 2012) – Senesco Technologies, Inc. (‘Senesco’ or the ‘Company’) (NYSE MKT: SNT) reported today that it has completed the first cohort of patients in its Phase 1b/2a clinical trial for the treatment of multiple myeloma in which SNS01-T was safe and well tolerated and met the criteria for Stable Disease in 2 of the 3 evaluable patients that comprised cohort 1.

The safety data for the group were provided to the Data Review Committee (DRC) which advised Senesco that SNS01-T was safe and well tolerated and that it is appropriate to proceed with cohort 2 and to escalate the dose level to 0.05 mg/kg, a four-fold increase. No drug-related serious adverse events or dose limiting toxicities were recorded for any patients.

‘We are extremely pleased with the results so far from the Phase 1b/2a study,’ stated Harlan Waksal, M.D., Chairman of Senesco. ‘The promising result that we observed in the first patient has been confirmed by a similar effect, Stable Disease, in another patient. We are looking forward to seeing the effect of increasing the dose level in the next group of patients.’

The requisite number of 3 patients was evaluable from a total of 6 patients enrolled in the cohort. In two of these three patients their disease had not progressed on treatment, based on several criteria including the monoclonal protein, and was considered stable at week 3 and week 6, the end of the dosing regimen. Three patients were withdrawn from the study by their physicians due to disease progression before completing treatment. One of the responding patients has continued to have Stable Disease at week 10, a month after the end of treatment with SNS01-T.”

The Hygiology Post welcomes feedback from readers as to whether the articles (individually and/or collectively) help fulfill its vision and mission.

 

Louis DeCola, Jr.                                    © 2012 The Hygiology Post